Condoms, the pill and other contraceptives

Let’s talk about Sex-ual Health

Need information, contraception or an STI (aka STD) checkup, but aren’t sure where to start?

Below is a quick breakdown of your contraceptive options, plus a few medical terms that can be tricky to understand. Talking to a nurse or doctor about what contraception is best for you or your partner is the way to go.      

 

While all contraception protect against pregnancy, only condoms protect against most STIs - so if you have a new partner or more than one partner, use a condom as well. And remember – many STI’s do not have symptoms, so both you and your sexual partner might not know if you have one. If you’re sexually active, look after yourself by getting checked regularly and expect others to do so as well.

Did you know? You can get boxes of condoms for free from the Community Clinic and Family Planning just by walking in the door!

 

 

What kind of Contraception?

 

Word

What does it mean?

Contraception/Contraceptive/Birth control

Something that prevents pregnancy

STI (STD)

Sexually Transmitted Infection

 

 

Contraception

What is it?

How does it work?

Condom

 

A thin sleeve of rubber that goes on the penis before sex, and gets thrown out after it has been used. Condoms are the best way to help protect yourself from sexually transmitted infections and are easy to get without seeing a nurse/doctor.

May slip off or split if not used correctly or if wrong size or shape

Condoms stop pregnancy by catching sperm, instead of it entering the vagina. Condoms also protect against STIs and can be used for vaginal, oral and anal sex

Oral Contraceptive

 

aka: The Pill

Contraception taken by mouth, typically known as ‘the pill’.

 Often reduces heavy bleeding and period pain, and sometimes acne. One little pill has to be taken every day, and works best when you take it at the same time each day. If you miss a pill then you are not protected from pregnancy

The pill works by releasing a hormone that tricks your body into thinking it is pregnant. Because of this, your womb does not release an egg, so there is nothing for sperm to fertilise after sex.

Some pills work by thickening the mucus in the cervix to create a barrier for the sperm.

 

IUD

 

An IUD is a small copper or plastic T shaped device which sits in the uterus (your womb).A copper coil works straight away and lasts for 5-10 years, whilst a hormonal coil works for 3-5 years (but both can be taken out sooner). A small procedure is needed to fit this device which usually takes about 15 minutes

 

The hormones or copper in the IUD stop the sperm reaching the egg, and also stop the egg attaching to the wall of the uterus.

Depo Provera

 

aka: The Jab

 

The Depo Provera is a single injection usually given in the top of your butt cheek, which takes just a few seconds. It lasts for 13 weeks, so you need to get the Depo given every 12 weeks (3 months)

The jab works by releasing a hormone that tricks your body into thinking it is pregnant. Because of this, your womb does not release an egg

The implant

 

aka : The Rod, Jadelle,

  • The implant is a small flexible rod (about the size of a hairgrip) that is placed under the skin in your arm.
  • A small needle is used to give a local anesthetic which will numb the skin. The implant is then inserted into the numbed part of your arm so there shouldn’t be any pain. This whole process takes just a few minutes and the rod lasts for up to 3 years (but can be taken out sooner)

The rod works by releasing a hormone that tricks your body into thinking it is pregnant. Because of this, your womb does not release an egg.

 

   

 

 

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